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past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a se
different kids thrive in different environments. i did come away with the conclusion it's vital that parents, staff, and students come together against a shared vision of culture, organically or through the hard process of mutual dialogue and understanding. i think the book shows the success that happens when that occurs when that happens and the struggles that a school un if doesn't. as one example, one of the schools i followed which struggled quite a bit in the first year did have this one sort of amazing success on that point, the principle early on in the year introduced the school, the students to the wolf fable, and the fable goes that there are these two wolves inside all of us constantly fighting and one wolf represents greed and anger, and the other wolf represents love and humility, and the moral is the wolf that wins at the end is the one you feed. that really took on a life of its own at the school and among the kids and students and students told each other to remember to feed the good wolf or to make sure the good wolf wins in the end. i think at successful schools, you have a
environment and with that said supervisor kim i will turn it back to you. >> thank you chair and i do want to acknowledge we have a enlighten board of supervisors in terms of our understanding of pedestrian safety, and i think a lot of that also is due to a lot of activists and community members who made this a priority issue to educate government and members of the community on this issue and of course they have been impacted on this as well and hopefully through the hearings we can push and encourage for better working -- a better coordination amongst a variety of departments and this sits in a lot of different purviews so again i want to invite you up and chaired the task force and a member of the sf mta. thank you for being here. >> thank you supervisors. i am deputy of planning for the sf mta also the transportation task force, co-chair with dhp. i'm going to give you a quick overview of the strategy and then what we're going to be talking about in the hearing so you can hear from the various departments on what they have have done since we have been developing this report. it's r
with the environment in which i lived as a child. and i think i was right about this. ten years ago, in the fall of 1998, i gave birth to a child. i became a cancer patient at 20 and a mother at the brink of people's lives are ordered, but that's how mine worked out. i am betting that in between my children's adult lives and my own, an environmental human rights movement will arise. it's one whose seeds have already been sown. i am betting that my children, and the generation of children that they are a part, will by the time they are my age -- they'll consider it unthinkable to allow cancer-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. sh is e of the seneca lake 12, a group
in what we think is going to be an okay earnings environment, but a challenging revenue environment. not every balance sheet is going to execute equally in this environment. you've got some opportunities for -- >> what it means is the fed is going to stay the course on quantitative easing, basically. >> i think that is very clear. >> greg, tell us about this new study you're out with today. >> we found three in four americans say they are not more inclined to invest in the stock market now given the fact that interest rates are at record lows and the stock market's recently hit highs. that's the same as we found a year ago. now, a year ago, you know, in the past year interest rates have come down further. the market's gone up more. yet people are not swaying. >> what's their big fear? that they've missed it already? they're afraid it's too high? they're going to pick moment? is there too many risk? what's the big fear? >> some of each. quite frankly the memories of 2008 are very fresh. a lot of people, 2008 wasn't the first time they'd been burned. they got burned in the tech bust.
the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ ♪ welcome home, man. >> hello, everybody and welcome, good afternoon. thank you so much for coming to join us for this celebration today. i'm renell, brooks moon from the morning show, and of course, the voice of your 2012 world champions, san francisco giants. >> in fact, the last time that i was at city hall was halloween 201
are accommodating growth in a manner that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm v
reflect environment review. dictionary tends to provide dictionary -- dictatorial [speaker not understood]. we the people have addressed so many times. [speaker not understood] education, schooling, work is based upon capital currency [speaker not understood]. monopoly capitalist, imperialist, racialist, [speaker not understood], surrounding planet earth sovereign nations with military basins defending its interests. witness 77 6 victory of african-american negro slave owners, declaration of independence, [speaker not understood] amendment of the constitution, fortification of the nation. this is such a timing for heart beat cloaked, environment review with this media entertainment, advertising industry, supernatural in party, opposition, an aura of fascist language, inflections, market speculation, 2013 pitch, who's who, mental health, george washington, and thomas jefferson, african negro slave owners, presidents, [speaker not understood] democracy dictatorship. 17 76, 2013, this reading given two minutes. >> thank you very much. before the next speaker, we have a 3:30 special commendat
, and local environment. lastly, i want to mention that i find it surprising that the committee will not allow members of the public to yield their time to well respected doctors that have traveled across the country to be here today with us. i do ask you to please vote against approving item number 8 on the rules committee agenda today and thank you so much for your consideration. (applause) >> [speaker not understood]. is there anybody else from the public that wants to testify? seeing none -- please get a card. come on up. >>> hello there. this is my first time doing public comment. and, quite frankly, [speaker not understood] i'll just do what i can because i'm a san francisco state student journalism major and [speaker not understood] minor. and these folks came from across the country and came to san francisco state to do a presentation on the science and all of the huge social implications that come behind having cell phones being next to your body. i mean, for the first time they had a measuring device where they're testing out with my phone. once i made a call or text o
's an opportunity for car pooling and school pool. there is another program with the department of environment that we're collaborating with and we're hoping to address that issue. >> so, very quickly, moving on, just some quick lessons learned on how we can improve our program. again, parent caregiver outreach is crucial. we really need to reach the whole family, not just the students. and not just the staff at the school. it's really the parents and caregivers are key. and that regular walking and rolling events are critical in getting more families out there walking and biking. and, so, we want to establish these regular walking school buses and regular bike training either separately or together. what we're proposing to do with the cycle [speaker not understood] from mtc, there are a number of changes and a number of things we'd like to keep. first of all, we'd like to expand the program right now. we're working in 15 schools. we'd like to explain that to 40. this is the only source of funding that actually allows -- the only source of grant funding that allows us to go up to high school.
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt's first people. you may remem
the environment. this has been through months of community outreach it's been changed foments. unfortunately, this most of us in the wrong direction. its promise is one that we have not had enough time to appeal. the bid before you is a simple one should we adopt rules that move forward please support supervisor wooenz legislation >> good afternoon coordinator of the sequa improvement team and happy earth day. today is earth day. i want to remind sequa and earth day were born in the seem time period. it's the strongest tool that the community has this sequa. and we should not take amendment the sequa process lightly. and even though we can't all the time the state law wherever you are asking the community to change sequa you're asking to change state law. and especially earth day is a time to take this seriously. supervisor weaning a lot of your amendments look interesting, however, we would also is a we spinster a lot of work working on the legislation that supervisor kim put forward and it's much more elegant a solution at this point. we want to make sure we wait until supervisor kim's le
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
to a safe and supportive learning environment. and we know that the right to that environment is critical to having an education. schools across california, including some of the state's largest school districts, are already accepting and supporting their transgender students and that's something that we're proud of to do here in san francisco, but we need to do more. and one of the things that is happening with many of these students is that you look at the suicide rates and their high. and it's important for san francisco to continue to speak out in support of these students. and, so, i ask for your support for passage of assembly bill 12 66. i want to thank my colleagues for their co-sponsorship, supervisor wiener, supervisor mar, supervisor avalos, and supervisor kim. the rest i submit. >> thank you, supervisor campos. supervisor chiu. >> thank you, colleagues. i have a brief item i'm introducing a resolution to urge the california state legislature to pass assembly bill 900 which would reverse reductions that were made in our state budget process a few years ago in medi-cal reimburse
in the after-hours, if people are short-covering they're doing it obviously in a more difficult environment. david: who would have guessed it was in double digits less than a year ago it is trading over 200. it hasn't traded over 200 a share since september 14th, 2011. this is long way coming. liz: long way to go. david: have you been to the airport recently? you go to the airport all the time. you go home to the airport to get back to new jersey. airport delays as faa furloughs begin to kick in. liz: rich edson at the airport. what are you hearing overall about the situation, rich? overall we got hundreds of delays yesterday. airline association says we could see up to a few thousand delays because of this when you look at this, go around the country, there are delays in charlotte, there are delays elsewhere. faa is saying there are delays basically close to coast. as far as specifics are concerned they could not provide us with any ties of numbers. that has a number about folks, especially republicans in congress say this is entirely structured by the faa to inflict what they say is maxim
in an environment that is sporting our good health and safety. so ultimately we can support yours. we consider this community our community, our home away from home. i would like to assure you that we remain committed to continuing our primary mission. that is to protect the lives and property of the people we serve. thank you very much. >> and so you can find out a little bit more about this facility. i would now like to call up the principal architect responsible for this facility. bill letty. with stacy architect. >> thank you, chief. you know, a little known fact is that every architect wants to design a firehouse. not just because many of us wanted to be fire fighters at some point in our lives, it's because these are really iconic hybrid buildings that we feel -- embody a building that express dignity and security for our community. these are important facilities for our community. when we are working on this project in the office we often joke that firehouse no. 1 is like a block on steroids with really big machines in the garage. it's been a great experience for myself an my team to
in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the hot zone. you obviously want to be in the cold zone. first responders, we're goi
, and menlo park. if you forget you will be charged ten cents per paper bag. >> it's good for the environment. we don't have the waste in the landfills and also harmful to animals. >> people have to pay attention to it. if you live in a place where they want you to bring your own bags, then do it. i think it's great. >> grocery stores are still able to provide plastic bags for produce and farm sis can still attribute small bags to hold prescription medications. >>> gas prices continue to slip across the country. here in the bay area as well. analysts say they could be even lower by the memorial day weekend. san francisco has the high spriests in the continental u.s. averaging $4.06 a gallon. around the rest of the bay gas is about 12 cents cheaper. that is down three cents a gallon in the last week. analysts say we could pay 20 cents less by the end of next month. >> let's hope so. >> remember when gas used to be 99 cents or $1 .99 a gallon. i remember those days. >> i just look at the total, sal. of how much it costs. >> it's kind of high. >>> good morning, everybody. the traffic is doing pr
want tepco to explain the impact the water is having on the environment around the plant. iaea representatives say they will submit their final report on the decommissioning plans within one month. >>> millions of people around the world remember the worst time of kim's life. the pulitzer prize winning picture of her running in pain following napalm bombing in vietnam is considered an image that conveys the atrocity of war. she continues to tell her story to push for peace. nhk world went to hear her speak in tokyo. >> reporter: kim has spent years talking about a moment of her life that is one of the enduring memories of the vietnam war. >> that day changed my life forever. >> reporter: it was june 8th, 1972. kim phuc was 9 years old, naked, and running down a road in southern vietnam. she'd been burned by napalm bombs. >> my clothes were burnt off. and my skin was on fire. and someone began screaming. too hot, too hot. >> reporter: the associated press picture captured worldwide attention. some say it helped end the vietnam war. the bombing and the photograph changed kim's li
tanks and a restroom structure. the city knew the environment was being impacted drastically. they realize this is a short- term solution but are working on funding more programs and more affordable house. >> we live in a beautiful community. the weather is very nice. encampments will always be at some level. >> reporter: outreach reporters have been trying to build a rapport for those at this site. so far 200 have joined programs. others have refused. >> i don't like them. i just don't like them at all. >> reporter: the cleanup will cost roughly $100,000. the city will pay half of that, the water district will pay the other half of that. back out here live, the city plans on putting up roadblocks here to prevent the homeless from using their vehicles to go down to the creek. they also plan on using private security to patrol the area. reporting live from janine de la vega, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> there are several new developments this noontime one week after the boston marathon bombings. brian flores is live in the newsroom with the charges of lone surviving suspect faces
that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] for good. a new developmt is set to replace it. but as k-p-i-x 5's patrick sedillo shows us: for some "dome" supporters, the fight isn' >>> i iconic dome movie theater is closing its doors for good. for some supporters the fight is not over, yet. >> reporter: pleasant hills go to movie house since 1967 fades to black. dome is closing its doors for good. >> we lived out here for 35 years and coming here for 35 years. reporter: the development obtained a permit to demolish the theater and it has many locals fuming. they have until may 3rd to remove the seats, popcorn machines, projectors and screens, home to thousands of memories. >> i am sad. i think it is a tragedy. pleasant hill, this is a real cultural part, soul, character of the area. we really -- when they take this down there will be nothing else left. >> when people think of the dome they think of the history here. consider people's first dates. out here a couple of months ago and here is what people had to say about their
to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs btween the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered an not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very quickly, becaus
anywhere here in oakland, even in a beautiful neighborhood like rock ridge. it's a target rich environment. >> reporter: in this case, the shooter took off without stealing anything, leaving one man hospitalized and the neighborhood rattled. >> the coast guard boat returned to the home port in alameda today after a month- long mission. she performed two rescues along the way, the first involving two people about 90 miles off of san diego in a sinking boat. the other was just two days ago when there was a cap sized boat off of san diego county. they seized more than 2400 pounds of marijuana. there's no word on when she will shove on her next deployment. >> a really nice day across the entire bay area. lots of sunshine as temperatures are back up into the 70s and 80s. even san francisco maxed out in the 70s this afternoon. right now on live storm tracker 2, you can pick out the radar and satellite loop. you will notice the clouds heading up to the north. but the bay area is in the clear right now. we are expecting clear skies for the overnight hours. as far as current temperatures updated fo
in the environment were almost all other schools are not unionized. the other charters that they compete for kids with. it is very different with a traditional public school environment with a monopoly. you could have one of 10 unionize the competing with the nine others it is a differing union in this scenario with the traditional schools. gerri: as this plays out of lot of people out there think the only thing that will happen is that the charter schools will gain more momentum at the end of the day the parents makes the decision. what happens? >> also statewide voucher laws that i new voucher just passed in alabama major cities as voucher programs like milwaukee and cleveland and washington d.c. it is exploding across the country as school choice. not just charter schools but i have actually forgot in your question. [laughter] the that is about the only form of school choice right now is. gerri: the unions want of a piece of the prize. >> but then looked at michigan who went right to work also indiana also wisconsin. gerri: the only area that aside union growth was public-sector because privat
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
. it was also a test of the media and many outlets failed. it was a chaotic environment where information was at a premium because the nation was scared and needing to know if the danger was ongoing and where it had come from and thus how to contextualize it. in those moments the egoes of media people come out wanting to show how connected we are, that we can get the information first or how smart we are we can make the big assertion first. in environments like that when the public and authorities are in a mob mode yelling for a body to attack, media must take extra care to not stoke the wrong flames or tell people of bombs, or connections to foreign terror groups that aren't real. in these moments we risk yelling fire in a crowded theater because incorrect information can cause a dangerous stampede toward an innocent person or group of people or sew fear that makes us think the world is more dangerous than it actually is. there is a desire within media to be first with big news, with developments that mark the closing of a chapter, with items that will change how swirn seve sees and repo
a different approach and a different legal basis. but simply because the threat environment changed doesn't mean that our constitution is so flexible that we can ignore its provisions. i do think that what we ought to call the administration to do is come forward with a new structure and to articulate how the rule of law will support protecting the country in this new threat environment. but there just wasn't the case for treating this brother as an enemy combatant and i think it was very premature for some of my senate colleagues to call for limb to be treated that way. >> interesting point. also interesting we need to really reconsider. thank you very much, congressman. we appreciate your time. "outfront" next, authorities stop another terrorist attack. this one on a train between new york city and canada. we have a i love live update on and talk to a man who was there when police finally captured suspect number two on that boat in friday. how police talked him out of the boat. here's a word you should keep in mind. unbiased. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. why? becau
of plastic bags and what they have on our environment and wildlife. the ban will apply in all county retail outlets, including grocery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurant food take-out or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods and prescription meds. now, if you don't have those reusable bags, the city of menlo park says they will be offering free reusable bags at places likely bay area's or recreation or senior centers. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> thank you. in california, we use a total of 20 billion plastic bags and the majority of them end up landlls oras litter. and speaking of trash, an annual unofficial pot party at golden gate park in san francisco left quite the mess for the city to clean up. according to the "chronicle," this weekend's 420 party at the park drew nearly 15,000 people and they left behind a mountain of trash. the clean-up tab for the city, $10,000. >>> speaking of tabs, the town of atherton is asking the white house to pay up. atherton was a fundraising stop for the president earlier
's not really an environment that we operate in that... that you can't bring a dog. logane's su a demand for themt itland says they'd be used on almost every mission if there were enough of them. and it's not just about their nose. ritland is training this dog rico to track humans and take down enemy fighters. he's three and a half years old, and ritland has been working with him for the past year. here, he's about to apprehend a suspect. these dogs can run faster than 30 miles an hour. the suspect is one of mike ritland's partners, and he's screaming to make this as realistic as possible. these dogs are trained to capture, not to kill. >> ritland: there's no human being on earth that can outrun them. you know, i can tell you that the physical capability of these dogs is impossible to explain hard evento comprehend when you see it. >> logan: how hard can they bite? >> ritland: hard enough to break bones. i had a dog bite me right here, like this. he only had his mouth on me for probably four or five seconds and broke my wrist. >> logan: he broke your wrist in four or five seconds? >> rit
to do was to reach out to the three services and of ain an environment constricting budget, why do you want to spend some much money on this? i reached out to the pentagon office that is managing the program to understand what they were doing to fix this program. to people outside the military to get their perspective. >> how cooperative was lockheed martin? >> they were pretty cooperative. they made some of their executives available to me for interviews. they got me to sit in a flight simulator. in crystal the river city, va., not more than a 10- minute car ride from capitol hill, as part of their flight simulator center, it is a place where members of congress and their staff members and other government officials can go. it is a chance to show off the virtues of the airplane to the washington crowd. i did travel down to an air force base in florida to see the plane in action. on the florida panhandle i pensacola. >> is there a prison down there? >> good question. figures are in a prison down there. >> i tried to stay away from prison. >> sunday, march 10, was when this article was
their children are in a high care quality environment. and people who take care of children for a living every day are very often not recognized especially in terms of compensation. the median income in the country for child care teachers is $11.14. san francisco i think might be a little bit higher but not by a lot. people who take care of their own children can't afford to take care of their families. i want to thank you for this honor. we look forward to working with you the next few years. our organization is really interested in helping make early childhood become a sustainable place to
for the environment. we don't have the waste in the landfills and it's also harmful to animals. >> they're messy, people throw them everywhere. they plug stuff up and i would like it to be a little cleaner for my grandchildren as they grow up. >> reporter: according to the san mateo health system, most end up as litter or in landfills. the new law will not completely eliminate plastic bags because some grocery stores may give them out for produce. if you forget to bring a bag, the store might charge you. >> people who are already charging you, they charge you for everything in the world. i think it's a cost that's not necessary. >> if i forget one at home, i am gladly going to pay the 10- cents. >> reporter: as a reminder you might want to put that reusable bag in your front seat that way you don't have to pay the extra money. i'm paul chambers, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> unincorporated areas of santa cruz county are toughening the ban on plastic bags tomorrow for earth day. the city of santa cruz exempted restaurants on the ban which began april 10th. >>> just how many acres have burned in a larg
spaces folks face that in their living environment and it makes an unsafe situation for them. in particular with seniors who tend to be more vennable they also end up with another barrier and that is actually even getting into the shelter system itself, so we have a shelter system currently set up that is very difficult to access. that's a line base system that takes -- people typically spend 14 to 17 hours to get a shelter bed and often for one night and have to repeat that process night after night and there are a lot of complicated reasons for that but a lot has to do with the care not cash initiative and the setting aside of beds and releasing them and holding them. another has to do with the design of the system and a fawltdy system that makes it very difficult for folks so for folk who is are elderly trying to simply find a place to lay their head to rest at night they're having to overcome significant barriers in order to do that. we have been working really hard to change that, and we did a lot of work in getting input from homeless people putting recommendations f
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
and the work that they've done. and clearly we know this is a different environment. and i really would -- i want someone who has the ability -- someone who has a history with this, who has an understanding and who has a life commitment to this particular cause. and clearly from her resume, from her letters of support, it's clear that she will bring that to the table. and she definitely has a history with san francisco, which i really respect. so, i'm happy to support moving her name forward for seat 6. and also ms. deborah mulse, i'd like to recommend that we move her name forward for seat 2. >> supervisor cohen. >> thank you very much. i wanted just to give a little discussion about the reason why i'm interested in supporting ms. freeman and the residency waiver requirement. throughout the course of my questioning, i'm trying to extrapolate the breadth and depth of the candidates' experience as well as ascertain their commitment to san francisco. and although mr. burgin lives in san francisco, like you heard in his discussion, just moved here from atlanta and has been in san francisco one
san francisco. county officials say the reusable bags are just much better for the environment. one shopper she had she agreed after seeing them floating around in the breeze in her neighborhood. >> i saw a bag fly away. i like this idea. >> but you have to remember to bring all your bags when you shop. >> i put in the car. >> i think it's smart. i just think it's one more thing for us parents to remember but i think it's a good idea. i have no problems with it whatsoever. we're very well prepared. we've been worrying about this for months so it's not a surprise. >> signs are up near the doors letting people know what's going on. san mateo, carlos, redwood city and east palo alto will follow soon with this same rule. the law basically applies to grocery stores, convenience stores, but not to restaurants. plastic bags can be used for produce, meat and prescriptions if needed. today shoppers telling us if they bought a little extra, paid a little more than they intended to, they were actually given free bags, reusable bags to get them started. they were pretty pleased with that. repor
-psycho-social assessment. so all aspects of their medical and their mental health and their social environment are assessed to understand what are the key barriers preventing them from reengaging the workforce. so that we can understand their entire health picture holistically. having these skills that you have in front of you right now is so important that some of us don't even realize it. that how listening skills is so important to us. individuals with mental health and substance abuse have many challenges. the most important one that they encounter is generally that society tends to be very judgmental and stereotypical and think that people with mental health or substance use can't be productive members of society, or that they can't work. well, i chase this life now, probably even more so than i did my drugs, you know, because i want it, i really want it. i want it just as bad as i wanted that heroin and that crack. i want this life just as bad. so now what i want you to do, i want you to type in, i am learning microsoft word 2000. i hope to learn at least one new thing in this training session. now,
and to the environment, as well. >> crews expect this to be a multiday clean-up job. the city did a sweep of the area last year in october. >>> there are fewer air traffic controllers on the job this morning. those positions across the country are being furloughed due to the federal spending cuts. ke l.a.x. chico's o'hare could delays from 10 minutes to an hour and if flight controllers at sfo escape the furloughs, bay area travelers may still feel the pinch. >> we could locally have no issues. but if another airport has a staffing shortage, has congestion, we could see delays to and from the locations. >> airlines filed a lawsuit against the federal aviation administration on friday asking a federal court to stop the furloughs of air traffic controllers. faa officials declined comment on the suit. >>> a member of the oakland school board will become the district's acting superintendent soon. gary yee was named a candidate for the job today. the school board is due to vote on the appointment on wednesday. yee has been on the school board since 2003 and he is in line to replace superintendent tony smi
for our country, this attack. whether or not we are living in an environment that looks more like israel and great britain under the ira where these sort of things happen and we become used to them. that is not a reality that any of us want to accept in this country. i wonder if the administration -- which side of this they will fall on. i think we will see from eric holder what their take is really on this when it comes down to the way it's prosecuted. any guthrie action to whether or not this -- gut reaction to whether or not this signals a change. >> reporter: i think they will say to try this american citizen through the normal civil courts, civilian criminal courts, and that may have a harder sell. i'm not saying that is not what is going to happen, i'm not saying that is not what the administration can do, but i think they need to make the case. remember at the height, martha, of the problems that the british had with terror attacks from the ira, they created a special set of courts named for a fabled british judge named lord diplock. they didn't use the formal process for certain
sweating in a cold environment. they're focused on what they're doing. they don't fit in with the crowd. so this is a way of actually, without the technology, but with the civilians or police or law enforcement officers actually looking for suspects in a crowd, these are some ways that you can actually find and detect a suspect like this. >> mike: you've been the pictures of the boston suspects. would they have given you cause for concern just by their appearances, the way they were behaving? >> no doubt, no doubt. immediately after the events, obviously, i was watching the video stream coming through. you can see that the crowd watching the finish of the boston marathon are watching the runners whereas these two were not watching the marathon at all. you know, they were very focused on where they were going. one was walking after the other, in a hurry, it seemed. their dress, their stride, the walk. there's a specific walk that a suspect of this nature has. a characteristic that a normal person, under normal circumstances, wouldn't have. so with the right training, even civilians can be le
. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. it is a positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization. host: national consortium for the study of terrori
environment for the exercise of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration of ngos as foreign agents but also restrictions on press and internet freedom act. so we've made clear our commitment to dialogue on human rights with the russian government, but we also remain actually committed to open dialogue with civil society and supporting their efforts. >> can i do a follow-up on that? i just wanted, i mean, the u.s. government has talked a lot about, concern about human rights abuses in chechnya. and i just wonder if you think the events in boston are going to change in any way the way the government will see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigationnbston, i just etars, that would be highly inappropriate to make further comment at this time. with respect to the situation in the northern caucasus, i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting. on russia and our country reports since 1995 you'll find quite a bit of information in this year's report. and they know serious human rights abuses taking place, and acts
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